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Group 1

Page history last edited by Vicente Huerta 9 years, 1 month ago

Title: Where Does Water Come From?

Project Authors:

  • Louis Blut, Eddison Middle School (Houston ISD), Houston, TX, louisblut1@gmail.com
  • Katrina Guillory, Johnston Middle School (Houston ISD), Houston, TX, athkatrina@gmail.com
  • Vicente Huerta, Johnston Middle School (Houston ISD), Houston, TX, vicente.huerta4@gmail.com
  • Meliza Hull Frederick, Johnston Middle School (Houston ISD), Houston, TX, melihull@gmail.com


Subject Area: Science

Intended Grade Level: 6th, 7th, and 8th grade

Description: This is a two-day (90 min periods) science project intended to develop student understanding of the water cycle, the importance of water conservation, filtration, and sources of clean drinking water.

Learner Outcomes:
Based on the Texas Essential Knowledge and Skills (TEKS) for Science -
http://ritter.tea.state.tx.us/rules/tac/chapter112/ch112b.html

Sixth grade -
(6.1A) Demonstrate safe practices during laboratory and field investigations as outlined in the Texas Safety Standards.
(6.2A) Plan and implement experimental comparative and descriptive investigations by making observations, asking well-defined questions, and using appropriate equipment and technology.
(6.2B) Design and implement experimental investigations by making observations, asking well-defined questions, formulating testable hypotheses, and using appropriate equipment and technology.
(6.2C) Collect and record data using the International System of Units (SI) and qualitative means such as labeled drawings, writing, and graphic organizers.
(6.2E) Analyze data to formulate reasonable explanations, communicate valid conclusions supported by the data, and predict trends.
(6.3A) In all fields of science, analyze, evaluate, and critique scientific explanations by using empirical evidence, logical reasoning and experimental and observational testing, including examining all sides of the scientific evidence of those scientific explanations so as to encourage critical thinking by the student.
(6.3B) Use models to represent aspects of the natural world such as a model of Earth’s layers.
(6.3C) Identify advantages and limitations of models such as size, scale, properties, and materials.
(6.4A) Use appropriate tools to collect, record, and analyze information …

Seventh grade -
(7.1A) Demonstrate safe practices during laboratory and field investigations as outlined in the Texas Safety Standards.
(7.2A) Plan and implement experimental comparative and descriptive investigations by making observations, asking well-defined questions, and using appropriate equipment and technology.
(7.2B) Design and implement experimental investigations by making observations, asking well-defined questions, formulating testable hypotheses, and using appropriate equipment and technology.
(7.2C) Collect and record data using the International System of Units (SI) and qualitative means such as labeled drawings, writing, and graphic organizers.
(7.2E) Analyze data to formulate reasonable explanations, communicate valid conclusions supported by the data, and predict trends.
(7.3A) In all fields of science, analyze, evaluate, and critique scientific explanations by using empirical evidence, logical reasoning and experimental and observational testing, including examining all sides of the scientific evidence of those scientific explanations so as to encourage critical thinking by the student.
(7.3B) Use models to represent aspects of the natural world such as a model of Earth’s layers.
(7.3C) Identify advantages and limitations of models such as size, scale, properties, and materials.
(7.4A) Use appropriate tools to collect, record, and analyze information …
(7.5A) Recognize that radiant energy from the Sun is transformed into chemical energy through the process of photosynthesis.
(7.5B) Demonstrate and explain the cycling of matter within living systems, such as in the decay of biomass in a compost bin.
(7.8C) Model the effects of human activity on ground water and surface water in a watershed.

Eighth grade -
(8.1A) Demonstrate safe practices during laboratory and field investigations as outlined in the Texas Safety Standards.
(8.2A) Plan and implement experimental comparative and descriptive investigations by making observations, asking well-defined questions, and using appropriate equipment and technology.
(8.2B) Design and implement experimental investigations by making observations, asking well-defined questions, formulating testable hypotheses, and using appropriate equipment and technology.
(8.2C) Collect and record data using the International System of Units (SI) and qualitative means such as labeled drawings, writing, and graphic organizers.
(8.2E) Analyze data to formulate reasonable explanations, communicate valid conclusions supported by the data, and predict trends.
(8.3A) In all fields of science, analyze, evaluate, and critique scientific explanations by using empirical evidence, logical reasoning and experimental and observational testing, including examining all sides of the scientific evidence of those scientific explanations so as to encourage critical thinking by the student.
(8.3B) Use models to represent aspects of the natural world such as a model of Earth’s layers.
(8.3C) Identify advantages and limitations of models such as size, scale, properties, and materials.
(8.4A) Use appropriate tools to collect, record, and analyze information …
(8.11B) Investigate how organisms and populations in an ecosystem depend on and may compete for biotic and abiotic factors such as quantity of light, water, range of temperatures, or soil composition.
(8.11C) Explore how short and long-term environmental changes affect organisms and traits in subsequent populations.

Time:  This project involves two-45 minute video conferences or one- 90 minute conference. There is a Small Group Activity and Whole Group Activity. It can be planned over a two week period. The teacher should schedule approximately one to two classes for preparation prior to the videoconference(s).

Preparation:

  1. ENGAGE
    1. Introduce lesson by playing a song (related to rain), such as YouTube’s Glee - Singing in the Rain & Umbrella or (Burt Bacharach & B.J. Thomas) Raindrops Keep Falling on My Head.
    2. Place students into groups of 3 or 4. Ask groups to develop a list of how water is being used in their everyday lives. Write group answers on the board. Try to have at least 10 different items listed on the board.
    3. As a demo, use scissors to around the outline of the Earth image. On a document camera, ask students to point to each continent and name all seven.
    4. Using a red marker, ask students to proximate the location of Houston, TX, and place a dot on the map. Inform students that the dot represents over two million individuals living in Houston, TX alone. Display photo representing two million people.
    5. Ask students to estimate in their groups the population of the entire state of Texas. Groups will discuss and present their estimation to the class. Write each group’s estimation on the board. After reviewing all group answers, notify the class that the answer is 25 million!
    6. Inform students the world population is estimated to be over six billion, which is the photo representing two million people printed out 3,000 times. Imagine all the water being used for everyday purposes!
    7. Have students notice the amount of water on the world image, and ask each group to discuss and decide how much of the Earth’s surface is made up of water. Write each group’s response on the board. [Answer = 75%]
    8. Now, ask each group to decide how much of Earth’s water is fresh and available for everyone to use in their everyday lives by representing the answer with the world image. Remind students that salt water is not fresh and usable.
    9. Have students discuss in their groups. Groups will decide a percentage of the water that can be used by instructing how to fold the earth image over and over again. Groups will share their answer and why the group decided that percentage. [Example: Folding the world in half represents 50%, folding the world again represents ¼ or 25%, etc.]
    10. Reveal the correct answer by folding the world image at least eight times (NOTE: You may notice it cannot be folded more than seven times.).
    11. Use a red marker to draw a line from the center of the world image to the edge. That line represents 1% of Earth’s fresh usable water.
  2. EXPLORE
    1. Ask students to discuss with their groups: “If Earth’s water is used for drinking, showering, cooking, drinking, pools, water sprinklers, washing cars, mopping floors, flushing toilets, etc., why do we still have water every day?”
      1. Ask students to develop a theory and share their findings with the class.
      2. While groups present their theory, listen for words such as: evaporation, condensation, precipitation, reuse, recycle, runoff, water cycle, etc. Depending on responses, ask groups to further elaborate and explain important terms.
    2. Review basic water cycle terms with the class, such as evaporation, condensation, precipitation, groundwater, and runoff.
  3. EXPLAIN
    1. Use urban water cycle image, and ask students to discuss in their groups how they would label the drawing to represent the water cycle. Remind them to use the appropriate vocabulary.
    2. One representative of each group will approach the board. Representatives will label and/or draw an important aspect of the water cycle. Allow class participation.
    3. Verify student answers for accuracy. Review findings with the class.
    4. Inform students that water is constantly recycling. The water students are drinking today has been around as far back as the dinosaurs. The water students showered in yesterday could be someone’s drinking water.
      1. Ask students: “How does the water become clean for others to use?”
      2. Answers may vary. Listen for answers that deal with filtration systems, and ask students to elaborate.


Optional review resources:

  • Eureka! Episode 18 - Evaporation and Condensation video
  • The Magic School Bus Wet All Over


Materials:
scissors, red marker, earth image, two million people image, urban water cycle image, duct tape, dirt, grass, leaves, olive oil, paper, rocks, pebbles , funnel, coffee filter, cotton balls, two liter bottles, toothpicks, rubber bands, bowls, two liter bottles, activity sheet, measuring spoons, measuring cups, procedural sheet, procedural group result sheet, performance assessment, collaborative work skills rubric

Video Conference Agenda:
Preparation prior to videoconference:
In-class before conference:

  1. The instructor will review the directions for the procedural handout and collaborative work skills rubric. Group roles should be assigned to ensure each student participates in the activity.
  2. Students will discuss in their groups which materials they would like to use, write out the filtration process they would like to attempt, and estimate the result of their water. The teacher will advise groups to consider putting the filtration materials in layers and consider the amount of materials to use.
  3. The teacher will allow two students per group to gather any necessary filtration materials (rocks, pebbles, funnel, straws, cotton balls, coffee filter, and toothpicks) as part of their procedures. The teacher will provide any assistance and will confirm that students are only collecting materials as stated on their Procedural Sheet.
  4. The teacher will show students the dirty water and explain that each group’s goal is to make their water as clear as possible. The teacher will provide the dirty water for each group. The teacher will remind students to NOT drink water samples and that each group MUST follow their procedures exactly.


Videoconference Day:

  1. Students should have all materials on their desk/lab table prior to the start of the video conference.
  2. The teacher will create the dirty water for each pre-cut bottle (one per group). The teacher will mix the contents with a spoon. The dirty water will include the following:

a. 1 cup of clean water

b. 2 tablespoons of oil

c. 1/4 cup of shredded paper

d. 1/4 cup of dirt

e. 1/4 cup of grass and leaves

f. 1 tablespoon of glitter


Small Group Activity – Videoconference Agenda (40-50 minutes)
15 minutes - Welcome and Introductions – Each class shares their location and some brief information about their school/community.
View LifeStraw in Kenya: CO2 for H20 video. (3:04 minutes)
5 minutes - Using materials on their desk/table, groups will build their filtration systems.
5 minutes - Groups will now test their filtration systems. Allow 5 minutes for their dirty water to pass through the filtration system.
5 minutes- After 5 minutes allow groups to write their observations on the back of their Procedural Sheet.
10 minutes- Allow volunteers from each site to share their observations of the filtration process.

Preparation prior to videoconference:
Videoconference Day:
Students should be given the Procedural Group Result Sheet upon entering the class.

Whole Group Activity- Videoconference Agenda (40-50 minutes)
5 minutes- Welcome and introductions. The main facilitator welcomes each class and reviews the directions of the Procedural Group Result Sheet.
7-10 minutes per class – In an organized manner, the teacher will rotate groups to visit other group filtration systems. Students will rate each group filtration system and the results of the water. After all observations are complete, students will return to their desk.
5 minutes - The teacher will ask students (by a show of raised hands) which group has the cleanest water. For example, ask: “How many of you believe Group 1 had the cleanest water (or the water with the least amount of contaminates)? How many believe Group 2 had the cleanest water?” The teacher will write the tally of answers on the board.
20 minutes- Volunteers will share their answers to some of the following questions.
The teacher may ask the following questions:
a. What did the group with the cleanest water do differently? Why did their water come out so clean (with less contaminates)? Can you tell what each material filtered from the water?
b. Do you think the water is now safe to drink? Why or Why not?
c. Did it take a long time for your water to pass through your filtration system? Why or Why not?
d. If you had more time and materials, what would you do differently to improve your water filtration system?
e. Do you think all countries have water filtration systems? Why or Why not?
f. If water is reusable and is replenished by the water cycle, should we still be concerned about the 1% of usable water in the world? Why or Why not?
g. Were you here during Hurricane Ike? Did you have clean water available at home?

5 minutes- Discussion wrap up. Students may continue to discuss their results and answers to the questions on the blog for homework. All students are required to participate.

Post Activities: Students will blog about their reflections and their experience.

Assessment and Evaluation:To help close the lesson, the teacher will ask students to state the main purpose of the lesson and to state strategies students may now consider to keep Earth’s water clear of contaminants in their everyday lives.

 

Attachments:

Got Water_ Commericial.pptx

FiltrationProcedure.pdf

FiltrationProcedure-RESULTS.pdf

Collaborative Work Skills.pdf

https://www.youtube.com/watch?feature=player_embedded&v=grgEqwHCuLY

 

 

Project activities extrapolated from materials developed by the city of Houston Public Works and Engineering Storm Water Maintenance Section

 

  • Keep Houston Beautiful
  • Kappa Delta Phi Honor Society
  • The University of Houston Department of Education

 


 

 

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